Electricity 101

 

 

Generation

This is for the cost of power generated and sold to the electric company by generation companies. This amount depends on the source of the power generated (ie hydropower, coal, geothermal, etc.).

This is a pass through cost Conventional (Coal, Diesel, Natural Gas) and Renewable (Hydro, Solar, Biomass, Geothermal, Wind).

 

Transmission

This is for the delivery of electricity from generation companies to the electric companies. This is a pass through cost. The present operator of the transmission infrastructure is the National Grid Corporation of the Philippines (NGCP).

     Types of Transmission

          1. On Grid

          2. Off Grid

 

Distribution

This cost goes to the electric company and covers the cost of Building, operating and maintaining the distribution of power to the Customer and converting it from high voltage to low voltage.

 

History of Electric Cooperative

 

 

The very first electric company to provide electricity in Manila, called the “La Electricista,” was founded in 1892. La Electricista built the oldest electric generating plant in the country, the Central Power Plant, on Calle San Sebastian (now R. Hidalgo) in Manila City.

What is an Electric Cooperative?

 

 

ECs are entities owned by the end-users within the vicinity covered by the said entity.

These ECs are controlled by Board of Directors, who were elected by the end-users.

 

Company Profile

 

 

 

        In 1969, the Provincial Electrification Cooperative Team (PECT) under the chairmanship of the then Governor, the late Antonio C. Carpio, initiated and laid the groundworks for the establishment of the first electric cooperative in the province of Batangas.  June 14, 1972 marked the inception of the BATANGAS I ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC. (BATELEC I) by virtue of Presidential Decree No. 269 with incorporators hailing from the different municipalities that initially comprised the co-op’s franchise area, namely: the late Jesus Inumerable of Calaca;  Joaquin Buenaventura of Calatagan;  the late Honorio C. Bello of Lemery;  Ramon R. Martinez of Balayan;  Dr. Francisco Calingasan of Tuy;  Conrado C. Calapatia of Agoncillo;  Atty. Sixto Rivera of Lian and Apolinario Malaluan of San Nicolas.

Engr. Bayani Marasigan (1972-1974) served as the first General Manager of BATELEC I.  Following Engr. Marasigan were Luis Q. Cerafon (1974-1975), Francisco S. Abelardo (1975-1982), Jose B. Orense (1982-1988) and NEA-appointed Project Supervisor/Acting General Manager Moreno P. Vista (1988-August 1993), who was recalled to NEA a month after the assumption of the coop’s new set of Board of Directors (BOD). 

Former Institutional Services Department Manager, Mr. Policarpio A. Segunial, who served as the coop’s General Manager from September 1993 to April 30, 1999, succeeded Mr. Vista.  Engr. Leovino I. Perez, former Technical Services Department Manager  followed and served as GM from May 1, 1999 to January 31, 2005.  He was succeeded by Engr. Ricardo C. Castillo, Jr. who served as Officer-In-Charge from February 1 to May 31, 2005. Then, former Finance Services Department Manager Mr. Demetrio V. Ellao served as GM from June 2005 to February 14, 2009.  From February 15, 2009 to November 2011, the coop was again headed by Engr. Ricardo C. Castillo, Jr.   Thereafter, department managers of the coop like Mrs. Celestina A. Famoso and Engr. Nilo G. Baylosis were appointed to manage BATELEC I for a short span of time. On April 27, 2012, BATELEC I is again under the stewardship of Engr. Ricardo Castillo, Jr. until his availment of the Early Retirement Program in December 2012.  Engr. Paulino T. Lopez of NEA acted as PS/AGM from January to November 2013. Mr. Orlando M. Andres was appointed Project Supervisor by the NEA  from December 2013 to December 2015.  At present BATELEC I’s General Manager is Engr. Alvin O. Velasco.

A non-stock, non-profit utility, BATELEC I serves the mission of providing efficient, reliable, affordable and adequate supply of electricity to its member-consumers on an area coverage basis for which lies the predominant task of harnessing the economic potential of the countryside as a nucleus of growth and development.

BATELEC I’s main office is located in the municipality of Calaca, province of Batangas, along the national highway with its buildings and facilities situated in a 4.1235-hectare land.  It has three area-offices located in Lemery, Balayan, Nasugbu and a satelite office in Calatagan. As of December 31, 2015, it has 386 regular employees.  Member-consumers’ representation in the cooperative is through the Board of Directors, whose members are being elected in each municipality and plays the role of the policy-making body.

As a service institution, the cooperative embodies the will to serve in the delivery of reliable power supply under a people and service-oriented performance.  In doing so, it utilizes a well-defined, organized and humble network of individuals armed with the expertise of providing dependable and excellent services.

The cooperative’s coverage area has a total land area of 93,742 hectares composed of 364 barangays of the twelve municipalities such as: Agoncillo - 21; Balayan - 48; Calaca -  40; Calatagan - 25; Lemery - 46; Lian - 19; Nasugbu - 42; San Luis - 26; San Nicolas - 16; Sta. Teresita - 17; Taal - 42 and Tuy - 22.  

These 12 municipalities that have a total population of 686,584 are situated on a plain, flat land with some elevated terrain, hills, and mountain ranges.  Its climate falls under the first type distinguished by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomic Services Administration (PAG-ASA).  Dry season is from December to May, and wet season is from June to November. Its atmospheric temperature varies from hot to normal and drops a little in the coming of the Yuletide season.  Mostly, the soil is volcanic in origin, which ranges from sandy loam in the eastern municipalities, and clay to clay loam on the western portion.

Western Batangueños in the coverage area primarily engage in farming, fishing/aquaculture and manufacturing.  Among its major crops are sugarcane, palay, corn, coconut, banana, fruit trees, rootcrops and vegetables.  Commercial trading of essential commodities is generally done in and around the market of each municipality.  Manufacturing operations are mostly centered on bakeries, garments, embroidery, cutlery, woodcraft, panocha making, achara making, bagoong & tinapa making and other small capital based activities.

With the advent of electricity, the quality of life of western Batangueños improved very rapidly and tangibly.  Sugar central, sugar refinery, ice plants, wine distilleries, prawn farms and hatcheries, beach resorts, welding shops, appliance stores, banks, garment factories and many other business entrepreneur opened doors for employment and created livelihood opportunities.

The cooperative’s coverage area has many tourist spots known locally and internationally being blessed with beautiful beaches, themeparks and archaeological legacy. Most famous are the Fantasy World in Lemery, Matabungkay Beach in Lian, Lago De Oro and Golden Sunset Resort both in Calatagan and Munting Buhangin Beach Camp in Nasugbu and many more, the historic Taal Basilica, which is known to be the biggest church in the Orient & the Fil-Hispanic houses lined the streets in Taal that enables one to have a glimpse of the Spanish era and lastly, Taal Volcano lying in the midst of the Taal Lake area, which is considered as the smallest and unpredictable volcano in the world.

Propelling the wheels of commerce and industry in BATELEC I service areas are the eight (8) substations in Butong, Taal (10MVA & 5MVA), Mataas na Bayan, Lemery (10MVA), Gulod, Calatagan (10MVA), Ermita, Balayan (10MVA & 5MVA), Camp Avejar, Nasugbu (2 x 10MVA) and Palanas, Lemery (10MVA), Natipuan (10 MVA) and Calaca 10MVA mobile substation transformer.  These power substations of the cooperative have a capacity of 100MVA and a total load of 58.24 MVA or 58.24% with an excess load of 41.76 MVA or 41.76%.

For 44 years in operation, BATELEC I can be considered as one among NEA’s successful electric coops because for several times, it had been bestowed the Category A+ Extra Large and Mega Large statures. At present, BATELEC I is one among the Category Triple A coops.  Further, BATELEC I achieved its avowed mission of 100% energization target in terms of barangay electrification where it has extended electric power to the total 364 barangays in the twelve (12) municipalities.  Moreover, the co-op has energized 164,587 households and 1,877.78 kms. of lines excluding underbuilt lines with  141,338 approved membership as of December 31, 2015. Today, BATELEC I carries on its task and expertise in providing dependable and excellent service to its clientele.

 

Corporate Philosophy

 

 

Mission

An electric distribution utility delivering efficient and reliable energy to homes, commerce, and industries propelling progress within its franchise area.

 

Vision

A leading Electric Cooperative recognized for its efficient distribution system and customer-oriented services by 2022

 

CORPORATE VALUES

Honesty and Integrity

Social Responsibility

Excellent Service

Commitment

Discipline

Respect 

Unity

 

Board of Directors

Management and Staff

 

Management

 

Staff

 

Regular Employees 404
Non-Regular Employees 2

Organizational Chart

 

 

 

Coverage Area

 

 

The area we serve are the following.

 

No. Municipality No. of Barangays
     
1 Agoncillo 21
2 Balayan 48
3 Calaca 40
4 Calatagan 25
5 Lemery 46
6 Lian 19
7 Nasugbu 42
8 San Luis 26
9 San Nicolas 16
10 Sta. Teresita 17
11 Taal 42
12 Tuy 22
  TOTAL 364

Map

  

 

Consumers Details

 

 

NATIONAL ELECTRIFICATION ADMINISTRATION

               
                 

MONTHLY REPORT ON THE STATUS OF ENERGIZATION

               
                       

EC NAME:

BATANGAS I ELECTRIC COOOPERATIVE, INC. (BATELEC I)

         

For the Month of:

                               JUNE 2016

 

 

           
                       

A. Electrification Level

                   
                       

 

 

Barangay

Sitios/Puroks

Consumer Connection

 

No.

Municipality

Potential

Actual

Todate

%

Potential

Actual Todate

%

Potential

Actual Todate

%

Membership

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Agoncillo

21

21

100

40

40

100

 7,668

8,653

113

8,019

2

Balayan

48

48

100

92

92

100

 19,905

21,844

110

17,598

3

Calaca

40

40

100

68

68

100

 16,129

19,261

119

17,837

4

Calatagan

25

25

100

83

83

100

 11,119

12,501

112

10,760

5

Lemery

46

46

100

64

64

100

 19,568

21,266

109

17,581

6

Lian

19

19

100

78

78

100

 12,050

13,574

113

11,203

7

Nasugbu

42

42

100

160

160

100

 27,694

29,187

105

24,275

8

San Luis

26

26

100

52

52

100

 6,957

7,940

114

7,172

9

San Nicolas

16

16

100

0

0

0

 3,806

4,546

119

4,061

10

Sta. Teresita

17

17

100

7

7

100

 3,638

4,014

110

4,113

11

Taal

42

42

100

10

10

100

 10,734

13,228

123

11,153

12

Tuy

22

22

100

77

77

100

 9,217

10,550

114

9,465

 

TOTAL

364

364

100

731

731

100

 148,485

 166,564

112

143,237

                       

NOTE : Reconnected accounts found not included / Data correction ongoing and coordinated to the concerned offices.

   
     

NOTE: Potential households updated.

                 

 

 

 

Consumers Benefits

 

 

The following benefits of consumers are the following

1. 5% Senior Citizen Discount

2. Monthly Raffle

3. Hog Dispersal Project

4. Pamaskong Handog

5. Eskwelight Program

 

 

Accident Causation

ACCIDENT CAUSATION

 

By ERAM | June 2016

 

          We all know that accident may occur unexpectedly which although foreseen is inevitable. Accident is an occurrence that interrupts the normal and orderly progress of any activity. This can lead to physical harm, damage to property or delay in operation and even up to the worst case scenario which is death/fatality. There are two (2) main causes of accidents. These are what we so called “Unsafe Acts (UAs)” and “Unsafe Conditions (UCs)”. UAs are basically the violations of safe and/or standard operating procedures whereas UCs refers to the physical or chemical property of a material and/or the working environment itself which are present within the areas of any activity. Be it distinguished that UAs and UCs can lead to hazards and/or accidents which can be controlled by an effective and constructive means of identification (before), investigation (after), evaluation (risk assessment) and correction (through engineering control, administrative control and PPE control which was defined/considered to be as the last line/resort of defence).

          To wrap it up, it is important to recognize environmental hazards or even cause stress within our respective workplaces. The magnitude or level of hazards leading into an accident can be accurately determined by the use of the above cited effective and reliable control measures. Take note: “Prevention is better than cure.” That’s why it is quiet necessary for us to collectively and enforcedly identify then evaluate certain workplace hazards before its too late. 

Reference: Image from www.jincom.com

Electrical Safety Posters

 

   
   
   
   
   

8 Tips on Home Electrical Safety

 

8 TIPS ON HOME ELECTRICAL SAFETY

By Real Living Team | May 25, 2015

 

1. Keep appliances away from water sources.

Avoid placing outlets and switches by the sink, bathtub, shower area, or pool to prevent electric shocks.

 

 

2. Cover the unused outlets with electrical tape.

This will prevent your kids from placing objects inside or play with the outlets.

 

3. Replace broken cords immediately.

Fix and replace frayed electrical cords as soon as possible as these can cause electric shocks.

 

4. Purchase high quality appliances

Check the details of appliances before purchasing—take note of the consumption and the brand. Ensuring quality helps you save on electricity while preventing household appliance fires.

 

 

 

5. Consult with an electrician.

 

If you've encountered an electrical problem and you're unsure as to how you can fix it, it's always best to ask help from an electrician. Going DIY when you are unsure may cause serious problems in the future. 

 

 

6. Avoid forcing a plug into an outlet.

 

Do not attempt to modify the outlet by forcing the plug into it. There are different kinds of plugs in the market today and there are different sockets too.

 

 

 
 7. Don’t overload extension cords!

The purpose of an extension cord is to provide better access to outlets. However, it is not the main source of electricity. Make sure that you plug heavy duty appliances to the main outlet.

 
8. Unplug appliances properly.

Some of us might have the habit of unplugging appliances by pulling cords. Always hold the plug to avoid frayed cords. 

 
Reference: http://www.realliving.com.ph Reference: Images from Google Images

External Links

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